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Margulies, A. (2014). The Otherness of Lacan, Fifty Years Après the Coup, an Essay on: Fundamentals of Psychoanalytic Technique: A Lacanian Approach for Practitioners by Bruce Fink, Norton, New York, 2007; 301 pp; $35.00. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 95(6):1330-1347.

(2014). International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, 95(6):1330-1347

The Otherness of Lacan, Fifty Years Après the Coup, an Essay on: Fundamentals of Psychoanalytic Technique: A Lacanian Approach for Practitioners by Bruce Fink, Norton, New York, 2007; 301 pp; $35.00

Review by:
Alfred Margulies

The Analyst as Artist: “[It is our task to bring] out from the start the three or four registers on which the musical score constituted by the subject's discourse can be read.”

(Jacques Lacan, 2006, p. 46)

I hope it is clear from my account in this book that the Lacanian approach to psychoanalytic technique is not likely to converge anytime soon with any of the English schools of which I am aware…[…] The disagreements … are on irremediable differences in theoretical perspective.

(Bruce Fink, p. 278)

There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, Than are dreamt of in your philosophy.

(Shakespeare, Hamlet, I.5)

Bach's Awe

On the cover of this handsome new paperback edition of Bruce Fink's Fundamentals of Psychoanalytic Technique is an arresting reproduction of a musical score written in Johannes Sebastian Bach's hand, his Fugue in A Flat Major from The Well-Tempered Clavier. Artistically rendered as a kind of photographic negative, the swirling musical calligraphy is mesmerizing - the sheer complexity and precision of Bach's notation mirrors the polyphonic richness of Bach's otherworldly genius: all these different musical registers, these different musical voices, intertwine into the utter uniqueness of his artistry.

When I attain presence to Bach's music, I hear these different registers not one a time - which is my usual reflex as I shift from one voice to another - but rather all at once.

[This is a summary excerpt from the full text of the journal article. The full text of the document is available to journal subscribers on the publisher's website here.]

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