Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To see statistics of the Most Popular Journal Articles on PEP-Web…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

Statistics of the Most Popular Journal Articles on PEP-Web can be reviewed at any time. Just click the “See full statistics” link located at the end of the Most Popular Journal Articles list in the PEP Section.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Colin, B. (2015). La séduction éthique de la situation analytique: Aux origines maternelles de la responsabilité pour l'autre [The Ethical Seduction of the Analytic Situation: The Feminine/maternal Origins of Responsibility for the Other] By Viviane Chetrit-Vatine PUF, Paris, 2012; 251 pp; £ 24.00. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 96(4):1183-1187.

(2015). International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, 96(4):1183-1187

Book Review

La séduction éthique de la situation analytique: Aux origines maternelles de la responsabilité pour l'autre [The Ethical Seduction of the Analytic Situation: The Feminine/maternal Origins of Responsibility for the Other] By Viviane Chetrit-Vatine PUF, Paris, 2012; 251 pp; £ 24.00

Review by:
Bertrand Colin

Viviane Chetrit-Vatine, in her latest work, formulates two original concepts: ‘ethical seduction’ and the ‘matricial space’. She draws upon two significant sources, the first being the philosopher Emanuel Levinas (1906-1995), considered here for his endeavour to ground philosophy in ethics - more specifically, an ethic (the primacy of the ‘Other’) which is ‘older’ than ontology (the primacy of ‘Being’). The second is the psychoanalyst Jean Laplanche (1924-2012), included here for the Copernican revolution this author ushered in - turning Freudian solipsism on its head (psychic functioning as understood from the starting point of ‘oneself’), substituting, in its place, the ‘basic anthropological situation’ (psychic functioning as understood from the starting point of seduction by the ‘Other’ - or generalized seduction theory). The rationale behind the juxtaposition of these authors is ‘primacy of the Other’ despite the fact that, though contemporaries, direct dialogue between the two men never took place. Levinas held psychoanalysis at arm's length, on occasion seeking to distinguish his views from it. He attempted to conceive of that which occurs “beyond, or before, consciousness” rather than the “unconscious” which, according to Levinas, retains “the structure of self-knowledge” ever destined to become conscious. Incidentally, on this point the British philosopher Simon Critchley (1998) has provided a helpful and illuminating critique of this Levinassian thorny issue.

[This is a summary excerpt from the full text of the journal article. The full text of the document is available to journal subscribers on the publisher's website here.]

Copyright © 2020, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.