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de Litvan, M.A. (2015). Panel Report, IPA Congress Boston 2015: Metaphors and the Use of Analyst as Tools to Improve Our Clinical Practisepanel and Small Discussion Group Organized by: IPA Project Committee on Clinical Observation. Int. J. Psycho-Anal., 96(6):1651-1654.

(2015). International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, 96(6):1651-1654

Panel Report, IPA Congress Boston 2015: Metaphors and the Use of Analyst as Tools to Improve Our Clinical Practisepanel and Small Discussion Group Organized by: IPA Project Committee on Clinical Observation Language Translation

Marina Altmann de Litvan

Chair: Adela Leibovich de Duarte

Panelists: Margaret Ann Fitzpatrick-Hanly, Marina Altmann de Litvan and Marianne Leuzinger-Bohleber

Reporter: Marina Altmann de Litvan

Small Discussion Group:

Chair: William Glover

Clinical Material Presenter: Ricardo Bernardi

Discussants: William Glover and Siri Gullestad (First level), Bruno Salesio and Marina Altmann de Litvan (Second level), Ricardo Bernardi (Third level)

The role and importance of metaphors in the analytic process were presented and discussed in the panel and the small discussion group in regards to the clinical observation with the Three-level model for observing patient transformations (3-LM).

The 3-LM allows analysts to understand, through careful and systematic observation, the areas where changes have taken place. At times it enables the analyst to see aspects that had previously remained unnoticed by the analyst. Metaphors usually appear in group discussions and in reports as some of the anchor points which the groups select; they allow us to track changes in the patient or in the transference-countertransference relationship. The purpose for this panel was to explore in depth how metaphors appear in each level of analysis of the clinical material, based on different group experiences with the 3-LM.

It was seen that metaphors are brought sometimes by the patient, other times by the analyst, or they emerge in the group discussion. Certain metaphors resonate with groups. All presentations in the panel underlined that metaphors emerge in a spontaneous process in most of the cases observed with the 3-LM.

The Panel

In my presentation I was interested in the way that metaphors have an important unconscious construction in finding meanings (Modell, 2005) which allow us to display or find the lines of force (pattern detectors) of the clinical material and therefore occupy a central role in the organization and categorization of emotional memory. I presented three cases with different metaphors discussed in clinical observation groups.

[This is a summary excerpt from the full text of the journal article. The full text of the document is available to journal subscribers on the publisher's website here.]

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