Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To save articles in ePub format for your eBook reader…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

To save an article in ePub format, look for the ePub reader icon above all articles for logged in users, and click it to quickly save the article, which is automatically downloaded to your computer or device.  (There may be times when due to font sizes and other original formatting, the page may overflow onto a second page.).

You can also easily save to PDF format, a journal like printed format.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Corbett, K. (2010). Mother Country: Discussion of Hazel Ipp's “Nell—A Bridge to the Amputated Self”. Int. J. Psychoanal. Self Psychol., 5:387-392.
    

Welcome to PEP Web!

Viewing the full text of this document requires a subscription to PEP Web.

If you are coming in from a university from a registered IP address or secure referral page you should not need to log in. Contact your university librarian in the event of problems.

If you have a personal subscription on your own account or through a Society or Institute please put your username and password in the box below. Any difficulties should be reported to your group administrator.

Username:
Password:

Can't remember your username and/or password? If you have forgotten your username and/or password please click here and log in to the PaDS database. Once there you need to fill in your email address (this must be the email address that PEP has on record for you) and click "Send." Your username and password will be sent to this email address within a few minutes. If this does not work for you please contact your group organizer.

OpenAthens or federation user? Login here.

Not already a subscriber? Order a subscription today.

(2010). International Journal of Psychoanalytic Self Psychology, 5(4):387-392

Mother Country: Discussion of Hazel Ipp's “Nell—A Bridge to the Amputated Self”

Ken Corbett, Ph.D.

Ipp's clinical narrative is examined for the ways in which the social, as it builds the psyche, is met by the psyche as it builds the social. Ipp reminds us that no matter where you find yourself, no matter where you are going, you begin at home (as Winnicott might have it); and, although home is a mother (also, as Winnicott might have had it), it is not only a mother. Home is a mother country; hence, the psyche–social. Home is also a place from whence one leaves. How mourning makes history, and how that history is socially shaped and reshaped, is also considered, as it underscores the therapeutic action of Ipp's clinical account.

[This is a summary excerpt from the full text of the journal article. The full text of the document is available to journal subscribers on the publisher's website here.]

Copyright © 2017, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.