Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To see translations of Freud SE or GW…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

When you hover your mouse over a paragraph of the Standard Edition (SE) long enough, the corresponding text from Gesammelte Werke slides from the bottom of the PEP-Web window, and vice versa.

If the slide up window bothers you, you can turn it off by checking the box “Turn off Translations” in the slide-up.  But if you’ve turned it off, how do you turn it back on?  The option to turn off the translations only is effective for the current session (it uses a stored cookie in your browser).  So the easiest way to turn it back on again is to close your browser (all open windows), and reopen it.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Hendin, H. (1978). Homosexuality: The Psychosocial Dimension. J. Amer. Acad. Psychoanal., 6(4):479-496.

(1978). Journal of American Academy of Psychoanalysis, 6(4):479-496

Homosexuality: The Psychosocial Dimension

Herbert Hendin

Homosexuality, suicide, crime, and drug and alcohol abuse appear to be barometers of social stress. In the case of homosexuality, the work of Abram Kardiner and Ralph Linton made us aware of how sensitive a barometer homosexuality can be.

Anthropologists had observed that relatively uncompetitive primitive cultures such as those that do not distinguish or reward the best hunters in distinction to the other men in the tribe have virtually no homosexuality. These observations took on added significance when Kardiner and Linton, in a psychoanalytic anthropological study of Tanala, examined homosexuality in the context of the entire Tanalese culture (1939). They showed that a dramatic rise in homosexuality when social and economic forces inflamed competitiveness was one of several manifestations of frustrated rage (crime was another) among young men who were having particular difficulty with the pressures the culture was exerting on them. How cultures resolve problems of competition and the aggression it arouses seems to be as critical a factor as relations between the sexes and in families in determining whether the incidence of homosexuality in any culture is high or low.

Homosexuality and other barometers of social stress arouse a concern that extends beyond the affected individual and his immediate family because they seem to threaten values that most communities have believed essential for survival. In reviewing the contribution of anthropology to our knowledge of homosexuality, Martin Opler points out that homosexuality in practically all cultures is regarded as a deviation from the majority values and norms of conduct (1965, p. 114).

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2018, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.