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Miller, D. (1983). Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy: Theory, Technique, Therapeutic Relationship and Treatability: Thomas J. Paolino, Jr., M.D., Brunner/Mazel, New York, 1981, 246 pp.. J. Amer. Acad. Psychoanal., 11(2):322-323.
   

(1983). Journal of American Academy of Psychoanalysis, 11(2):322-323

Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy: Theory, Technique, Therapeutic Relationship and Treatability: Thomas J. Paolino, Jr., M.D., Brunner/Mazel, New York, 1981, 246 pp.

Review by:
Daniel Miller, M.D.

In his introduction, the author states “An attempt has been made to put into words what many psychoanalytic therapists have been doing for years, often take for granted and often refer to as self explanatory.” The book is also recommended for many associated disciplines in therapy, research, and, partly, for nonclinical students. The key controversies are identified and presented with clarity and adequate references. Psychoanalysis is seen as constantly evolving and, therefore, the intent is to present material so that it can be subject to revision in accordance with new clinical experience.

As to the delineation between psychoanalysis and psychoanalytic psychotherapy Paolino chooses the perspective of a “blurred difference” (BD) rather than the “sharp difference” (SD) so fervently defended by the “purists” among classically oriented analysts. Each position is reviewed from aspects of technique, transference, and goals of therapy: “Many SD proponents are blinded by a need for tradition, a worship of authority and a fear of emancipation from the creative genius of Freud. The best therapy is one in which the therapist allows himself technical flexibility. According to the BD perspective of this book, one patient in psychoanalytic therapy may come five times a week, another once a week; one may lie on a couch while another sits up; one may free associate and deal primarily with childhood experiences while another may do little free association and deal instead with current conflicts.

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