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Homans, P. (1996). Lingering Shadows: Jungians, Freudians and Anti-Semitism: Aryeh Maidenbaum and Stephen A. Martin, Shambala, Boston, 1991, 416 pp., $35 (for Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis).. J. Amer. Acad. Psychoanal., 24(1):188-191.

(1996). Journal of American Academy of Psychoanalysis, 24(1):188-191

Lingering Shadows: Jungians, Freudians and Anti-Semitism: Aryeh Maidenbaum and Stephen A. Martin, Shambala, Boston, 1991, 416 pp., $35 (for Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis).

Review by:
Peter Homans

Ever since the historic “break” between Freud and Jung, as the editors of this book point out, many Freudians and Jungians have held with great conviction two utterly contradictory convictions about Carl G. Jung: he was an anti-Semite, perhaps a Nazi (the Freudians); or, his personal relationships and public writings displays exemplary tolerance (the Jungians). In 1989, Aryeh Maidenbaum, an historian (Ph.D., Hebrew University) and a Jungian analyst, and Stephen Martin, a Jungian analyst—skeptical of both received views—organized a conference in New York City in order to study their historical basis. They invited Jungians, non-Jungians, and serious academicians to address the issue. The conference was sponsored by the New School for Social Research, the Union of American Hebrew Congregations, the Post-Graduate Center for Mental Health, and the New York C. G. Jung Foundation. They published the conference papers as Lingering Shadows, which they also hope will serve as an introductory sourcebook on the subject.

In addition to a clear introduction, there are 18 essays, plus an appendix, which contains a comprehensive, historically organized reprinting of all of Jung's published remarks on race and Jews, and a bibliographic survey of the secondary literature. The personal and professional lives of the authors differ widely. Many are Jungian analysts. Among these, some were in analysis or were friends with Jung, others are too young to have known him.

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