Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To keep track of most cited articles…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

You can always keep track of the Most Cited Journal Articles on PEP Web by checking the PEP Section found on the homepage.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Ragan, C.L. (2006). Comparing Apples to Oranges and Making a Fruit Salad (Mixing Psychodynamic Science and Neuroscience): A Review of Clay C. Whitehead's “Neo-Psychoanalysis: A Paradigm for the 21st Century”. J. Amer. Acad. Psychoanal., 34(4):629-649.

(2006). Journal of American Academy of Psychoanalysis, 34(4):629-649

Comparing Apples to Oranges and Making a Fruit Salad (Mixing Psychodynamic Science and Neuroscience): A Review of Clay C. Whitehead's “Neo-Psychoanalysis: A Paradigm for the 21st Century” Related Papers

Charles L. Ragan, M.D., M.B.A.

Clay C. Whitehead has elegantly announced, with his broad concept of “downward causation” (Campbell, 1974), the arrival of a new paradigm for psychoanalytic understanding, theory, process, and therapeutic action. In such an endeavor, he proposes to review and integrate various threads of thought which have contributed to psychoanalytic metapsychology over the past many centuries. More specifically, this article contextualizes this new paradigm from the perspectives of episte-mology and of the theory of therapeutic action, as they might be integrated by employment of multiple perspectives: philosophy, metapsychology, evolutionary biologic-genetic concepts, physical anthropology, psychiatry, and neuroscience with recent functional imaging studies. He refines George Engel's (1962) concept of the “bio-psycho-social” perspective on formulations of expressions of symptoms. He particularly offers his vision as a “paradigm shift” (Kuhn, 1970), strongly buttressing his argument by citing the classic Cartesian dualistic split between “traditional science” and “psychodynamic science” as being built upon a confusion of categories of understanding, the “mereological fallacy.” In fact, he sees this fallacy as the fundamental flaw in Freud's otherwise highly original thought, which led him to focus primarily upon an intrapsychic, instinctual, one-mind based psychology.

Although this concern is reasonable, his explication far exceeds the needs of the workaday practitioner of psychiatry, psychoanalysis, psychotherapy, psychology, or even of early childhood play therapists.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2019, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.