Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To see Abram’s analysis of Winnicott’s theories…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

In-depth analysis of Winnicott’s psychoanalytic theorization was conducted by Jan Abrams in her work The Language of Winnicott. You can access it directly by clicking here.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Eckardt, M.H. (2008). Influential Papers from the 1940s: Papers from the Decades in International Journal of Psychoanalysis Key Papers Series, Edited by R.D. Hinshelwood, Karnac Books, New York, 2005, 364 pp., $45.00.. J. Amer. Acad. Psychoanal., 36(4):773-777.

(2008). Journal of American Academy of Psychoanalysis, 36(4):773-777

Influential Papers from the 1940s: Papers from the Decades in International Journal of Psychoanalysis Key Papers Series, Edited by R.D. Hinshelwood, Karnac Books, New York, 2005, 364 pp., $45.00.

Review by:
Marianne H. Eckardt, M.D.

Edited by:
César A. Alfonso, M.D.

The publication by the International Journal of Psychoanalysis of Influential Papers from the Decades is an important contribution. Only history gives us a perspective of the dynamic evolvement of psychoanalysis allowing patterns to emerge in spite of incredible diversity. Due to the turmoil, displacements and war of the Hitler period, change in the 1940s was inevitable and affected every aspect of life, inviting new ways of coping and perception. This period profoundly metamorphosed the psychoanalytic landscape both in England and in the United States. World War II (1939-1945) restricted the international reach of the International Journal. In this volume all but one of the papers are by English authors or by psychoanalysts residing in Britain. But even the happenings in Britain were not well covered. You will find no reference to the confrontational battles between Melanie Klein and Anna Freud and their respective adherents. This volume does highlight the creative dominance of Melanie Klein's school of thought; creative because many of her original students and admirers went on to evolve their own ideas and form an “independent group” which was free of coercive allegiances to either Freud or Klein. There existed a strong commitment to a psychoanalytic understanding of the earliest stages of ego development. This independent group is here represented by Michael Balint (who arrived from Budapest influenced by Frenczi), and by Ronald Fairbairn, Donald Winnicott, and John Bowlby.

Though the contributions of these analysts have become well known, reading their original papers is a very different experience.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2020, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.