Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To see the German word that Freud used to refer to a concept…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

Want to know the exact German word that Freud used to refer to a psychoanalytic concept? Move your mouse over a paragraph while reading The Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud and a window will emerge displaying the text in its original German version.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Bene, A. (1978). “Beyond the Infantile Neurosis” Collected Essays Sara Rosenfeld London; Sara Rosenfeld Research Fund, Hampstead Clinic, £2.50. J. Child Psychother., 4(4):137-138.
    

(1978). Journal of Child Psychotherapy, 4(4):137-138

Book Reviews

“Beyond the Infantile Neurosis” Collected Essays Sara Rosenfeld London; Sara Rosenfeld Research Fund, Hampstead Clinic, £2.50

Review by:
Agi Bene

It was predictably a good, moving, learning experience, to read through Sara Rosenfeld's essays: writing which spreads over almost twenty years. This permits us to follow the main trends of Sara Rosenfeld's thinking and clinical work. We knew from the title of her essays, from Anna Freud's foreword, and from working with her in The Hampstead Clinic, that her interest and writing was centred on the “atypical” or “borderlinechild's life and development. This interest started in the early fifties, when comparatively little was discussed and written about this “dark area” of childhood disturbances. It was about this time that she gathered around herself, in The Hampstead Clinic, interested child therapists and founded the Borderline Research Group. She stimulated and co-ordinated our thinking and clinical work with these “puzzling” children. The two papers which emerged from the seventeen years work in the Group were written together with the Borderline Group's secretary, Marjorie Sprince, and appeared in the Psychoanalytic Study of The Child. They are well known and often quoted, even in recent literature dealing with borderline pathology, though both papers were written in the Sixties. Sara Rosenfeld's ability to draw together, synthesise and express clearly her own and other people's findings and experiences is well reflected in these two papers. The first, “An attempt to formulate the meaning of the concept of Borderline” was an effort to define the common dynamics of these children, each of them presenting so differently from the others.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2020, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.