Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To save articles in ePub format for your eBook reader…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

To save an article in ePub format, look for the ePub reader icon above all articles for logged in users, and click it to quickly save the article, which is automatically downloaded to your computer or device. (There may be times when due to font sizes and other original formatting, the page may overflow onto a second page.).

You can also easily save to PDF format, a journal like printed format.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Hurry, A. (1988). Erna Furman: Helping Young Children Grow and The Teacher's Guide to Helping Young Children Grow. Published by International Universities Press, Inc., Madison, Connecticut, 1987. Hardbacks.. J. Child Psychother., 14(2):115-116.

(1988). Journal of Child Psychotherapy, 14(2):115-116

Erna Furman: Helping Young Children Grow and The Teacher's Guide to Helping Young Children Grow. Published by International Universities Press, Inc., Madison, Connecticut, 1987. Hardbacks.

Review by:
Anne Hurry

Child Psychotherapists are painfully aware that individual treatment can be available to very few children, and are asked to take a preventive role, e.g., through consultation and courses for other workers in the field. Over-busy as many of us are, we have hardly been able to take time to consider the most effective form that such preventive work might take. These books bring an exciting new perspective to this field, and one that demands our consideration.

Since 1978, Erna Furman and her colleagues at the Cleveland Center for Research in Child Development have been running courses for adolescents in senior high schools. These courses in Child Development are in fact a preparation for parenthood. The Furmans used the Socratic method, building on the adolescents' own observations, questions and thoughts. And as they developed the course, they carried out a meticulous study of their own teaching method as well as of each student's development. This is action research at its best.

In all, some 2,000 students have taken the course. The Furmans found that late adolescents were best able to make use of their method: at that stage the course could further healthy developmental progress as well as help adolescents to develop and integrate their view of themselves as potential parents — often different from, but appropriately appreciative of, their own parents. The course was less suitable for younger adolescents. (This finding has implications for those courses in human development which are currently available in some schools.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2020, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.