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Tip: To sort articles by year…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

After you perform a search, you can sort the articles by Year. This will rearrange the results of your search chronologically, displaying the earliest published articles first. This feature is useful to trace the development of a specific psychoanalytic concept through time.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Chazan, S. (2013). Minding the Child: Mentalization-Based Interventions with Children, Young People and their Families. (2012). Nick Midgley & Ioanna Vrouva (Eds.): London, England: Routledge. $37.95. J. Infant Child Adolesc. Psychother., 12(2):134-137.

(2013). Journal of Infant, Child & Adolescent Psychotherapy, 12(2):134-137

Book Review

Minding the Child: Mentalization-Based Interventions with Children, Young People and their Families. (2012). Nick Midgley & Ioanna Vrouva (Eds.): London, England: Routledge. $37.95

Saralea Chazan

Minding the Child: Mentalization-Based Interventions with Children, Young People and their Families. (2012). Nick Midgley & Ioanna Vrouva (Eds.)

This slender volume is both an introduction to the concept of mentalization and a survey of selected current interventions that focus on this basic human capacity and how it can become derailed. The idea for the book was inspired by two conferences that took place in 2010, one at the Anna Freud Centre in London and the second at the Yale Child Study Centre in New Haven, Connecticut. The authors represent an international forum drawing from clinical venues in several countries including the United States, Britain, Holland, Greece, and Scandanavia.

Nick Midgely is Director of Programme for the MSc in Developmental Psychology and Clinical Practice at the Anna Freud Centre/University College London. Ioanna Vrouva is a Trainee Clinical Psychologist at the University College London, where she received her PhD. In their introductory remarks, they cite Fonagy's definition of mentalization as “a form of imaginative mental activity, namely, perceiving and interpreting human behavior in terms of intentional mental states” (Fonagy, Gergely, Jurist, & Target, 2002). The authors claim that over the last 20 years, this concept has come increasingly to be recognized as a fundamental component of what it means to be human.

Midgley and Vrouva emphasize the central role mentalization plays in affect regulation and the development of a coherent sense of self. They suggest the developmental processes operationalized in the concept of mentalization are central to a variety of clinical interventions.

[This is a summary excerpt from the full text of the journal article. The full text of the document is available to journal subscribers on the publisher's website here.]

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