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Schore, A.N. (2013). Regulation Theory and the Early Assessment of Attachment and Autistic Spectrum Disorders: A Response to Voran's Clinical Case. J. Infant Child Adolesc. Psychother., 12(3):164-189.

(2013). Journal of Infant, Child & Adolescent Psychotherapy, 12(3):164-189

Regulation Theory and the Early Assessment of Attachment and Autistic Spectrum Disorders: A Response to Voran's Clinical Case Related Papers

Allan N. Schore

From the interpersonal neurological perspective of regulation theory, the discussant uses the essential questions raised by the author as a springboard to explore and elaborate upon the larger problem of assessments and interventions in the first year, a critical period for attachment transactions and the brain growth spurt. Describing regulation theory, a theory of the development, pyschopathogenesis and treatment of the implicit self, Dr. Schore divides his discussion into three sections: 1) The Right Brain, Attachment, and Early Human Development, 2) Clinical Implications of Developmental Neuroscience for Early Assessment of Autistic Spectrum Disorders, and 3) Clinical Implications of Developmental Neuropsychoanalysis for Psychodynamic Clinicians.

[This is a summary excerpt from the full text of the journal article. The full text of the document is available to journal subscribers on the publisher's website here.]

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