Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To convert articles to PDF…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

At the top right corner of every PEP Web article, there is a button to convert it to PDF. Just click this button and downloading will begin automatically.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Jackson, M. (1960). Family Influences and Psychosomatic Illness: An Inquiry into the Social and Psychological Background of Duodenal Ulcer, by E. M. Goldberg. London, Tavistock Publications, 1958. pp. 308. 38s.. J. Anal. Psychol., 5(1):82-83.
    

(1960). Journal of Analytical Psychology, 5(1):82-83

Family Influences and Psychosomatic Illness: An Inquiry into the Social and Psychological Background of Duodenal Ulcer, by E. M. Goldberg. London, Tavistock Publications, 1958. pp. 308. 38s.

Review by:
Murray Jackson

This book represents a part of an investigation into “Family Relations, Personality Development, and Duodenal Ulcer” that was recently conducted under the auspices of the Social Medicine Research Unit of the Medical Research Council. The team was composed of a psychiatric social worker (the author), a psychologist (Mr. Kanter), and a psychiatrist (Dr. Turquet). They were concerned with finding answers to the question “what are the factors, social and psychological, that may be contributing to the increase of duodenal ulcer in our population?” As there are over a million people in this country suffering from duodenal ulcer, and probably a much greater number with related gastro-duodenal disorders, this is clearly a burning question.

The author compares the family background of 32 young men suffering from duodenal ulcer with those of 32 controls drawn from the list of a general practitioner. She interviewed the families and evaluated the upbringing of the subjects with the aim of detecting meaningful differences between the groups, and of elucidating the essential dynamics, conscious and unconscious, of the families. Her findings lead her to formulate various tentative hypotheses about the object relationships of DU subjects. Their background is largely a stable and rather specific one. The mother plays the dominant role, binding her son to her in a variety of ways, and the father is an inadequate figure with whom the growing boy, trying to struggle free from the world of the powerful mother, is unable to identify effectively.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2020, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.