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Hubback, J. (1971). Isca Salzberger-Wittenberg Psycho-analytic insight and relationships: Kleinian approach. London, Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1970. pp. xvii + 178. £ 1·50.. J. Anal. Psychol., 16(2):224.

(1971). Journal of Analytical Psychology, 16(2):224

Isca Salzberger-Wittenberg Psycho-analytic insight and relationships: Kleinian approach. London, Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1970. pp. xvii + 178. £ 1·50.

Review by:
Judith Hubback, M.A.

Edited by:
Mary Welch

This book is one of a series designed to meet the needs of students in training for social work. But, lest analytical psychologists be immediately put off reading it (or reading about it) they should perhaps concede that in the eyes of the public they are ultimately no more than specialized members of the same company as social workers. And those who become analysts by other than the social work approach-road to the profession could on occasions benefit by the clarity of exposition that such a students' book as this necessarily has. It has some of the characteristics of a handbook which could be consulted when, for example, in a dilemma as to whether to regard a patient's current productions more helpfully as manifestations of envy, or as defensive against persecutory anxiety.

Yet the book stems from the author's personal experience in social science, casework, child psychotherapy and Kleinian psychoanalysis, and a small group of caseworkers joined her in discussions of cases and problems, which helped her to work out her views on the relevance of psychoanalytic views to social work. Though sectionalized and even tabulated, in its actual fabric it is not, to a Jungian, rigidly over-clear and self-assertive, as were the pioneering papers of Klein herself.

The first part is on aspects of the caseworker-client relationship; the second outlines the nature and workings of the nuclear anxieties, of typical emotional crises and personality traits; these two sections incorporate many elements of basic theory dating from Freud and Abraham, together with Kleinian developments.

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