Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To see definitions for highlighted words…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

Some important words in PEP Web articles are highlighted when you place your mouse pointer over them. Clicking on the words will display a definition from a psychoanalytic dictionary in a small window.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Pye, F. (1972). BARBARA HANNAH: Striving towards wholeness. New York, G. P. Putnam's Sons for the C. G. Jung Foundation for Analytical Psychology, 1971. pp. IX-X +313. $7.00.. J. Anal. Psychol., 17(2):224-225.
    

(1972). Journal of Analytical Psychology, 17(2):224-225

BARBARA HANNAH: Striving towards wholeness. New York, G. P. Putnam's Sons for the C. G. Jung Foundation for Analytical Psychology, 1971. pp. IX-X +313. $7.00.

Review by:
Faye Pye

This book contains the quintessential experience of a senior analytical psychologist who worked closely and continuously with Jung over many years. As she herself suggests, her theoretical assumptions have been moulded by Jung, so that they can perhaps be said to be in the best sense of the word ‘traditional’.

At the same time she has made these assumptions uniquely her own, and has assimilated them into the context of her own personality and of her English cultural background. The pattern of the individuation process, its characteristic dynamism and symbolism, are demonstrated in the material of a number of creative English personalities of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Since these personalities were also all novelists, their literary works are available for interpretation. Miss Hannah treats the novels together with the lives of R. L. Stevenson, the Brontës and Mary Webb, assuming the novels to be projections of the authors’ inner lives. The central theme is the emergence of the ego from original unconscious wholeness of the psyche, and its journey through inner and outer vicissitudes towards varying degrees of conscious wholeness.

There are striking similarities in the experience and fates of the writers Miss Hannah deals with, but perhaps none more so than that they all died relatively young. Nevertheless the implications of these similarities are not restricted to the purely personal experience, fate or even health of the subjects as individual organisms.

There are also profound cultural and religious implications.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2020, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.