Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To review the bibliography…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

It is always useful to review an article’s bibliography and references to get a deeper understanding of the psychoanalytic concepts and theoretical framework in it.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Thomson, J. (1990). Mattoon, M. A. (Ed.) The Archetype of Shadow in a Split World: Proceedings of The Tenth International Congress for Analytical Psychology, Berlin, 1986. ZÜrich, Daimon Verlag, 1987. Pp. 442. Paperback, £14, SF. 35.. J. Anal. Psychol., 35(3):366-367.

(1990). Journal of Analytical Psychology, 35(3):366-367

Mattoon, M. A. (Ed.) The Archetype of Shadow in a Split World: Proceedings of The Tenth International Congress for Analytical Psychology, Berlin, 1986. ZÜrich, Daimon Verlag, 1987. Pp. 442. Paperback, £14, SF. 35.

Review by:
Jean Thomson

This collection of papers illustrates the wide scope of one of Jung's central concepts, the archetype of the shadow. The title was conceived as a basis for the Congress before the recent changes in the balance of political world power. Perhaps we are now, in 1990, seeing a shift away from the ‘split world’ of paranoid defence systems and mutual projective identifications, which were holding apart two idealising ideologies. The more chaotic world situation which has emerged might turn out to be less potentially destructive if a different set of projections were making possible a greater capacity for dialogue.

At the time, the symbol of The Wall dominated the Congress. Thomas Kirsch, from San Francisco, expressed this in the opening address. One of his patients had dreamed of the Wall dividing the city but new buildings were being built. He, Kirsch, saw that the patient was coming out of his depression but he could not believe that ‘the wall’ could ever be demolished.

The paper by Nathan Schwartz-Salant on The archetypal foundations of projective identification confines itself to the personal and clinical; but the material in it lends itself to extrapolation on to the socio-political sphere where the ‘opposites’, when seen to have component parts, can also be seen to have the potential for the integration of those parts.

Some of the papers did concern themselves with such socio-political issues, some focused on clinical applications, and some attempted to link the two.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2020, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.