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Young-Eisendrath, P. (1998). GALLANT, CHRISTINE. Tabooed Jung: Marginality as Power. New York: New York University Press, 1996. Pp. v + 185. Hbk £35.00.. J. Anal. Psychol., 43(3):419-421.
   

(1998). Journal of Analytical Psychology, 43(3):419-421

GALLANT, CHRISTINE. Tabooed Jung: Marginality as Power. New York: New York University Press, 1996. Pp. v + 185. Hbk £35.00.

Review by:
Polly Young-Eisendrath

In Tabooed Jung: Marginality as Power, Christine Gallant argues that Jung was made ‘taboo’ by Freud and his early circle, even though many of Jung's ideas were appropriated by Freud. As Freud said of persons or things that are taboo: ‘[They] are the seat of a tremendous power which is transmissible by contact’ (quoted on p. 23). Gallant believes that Jung's taboo power creates an irrational fear of his work in Freudian psychoanalysts up to the present day. Accusations about Jung from the earliest Viennese circle to the present moment tend to be that he is not scientific, is too mystical, and concerns himself with experiences beyond intellectual comprehension. The same can be said of Freud.

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