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PEP-Easy Tip: To save PEP-Easy to the home screen

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

To start PEP-Easy without first opening your browser–just as you would start a mobile app, you can save a shortcut to your home screen.

First, in Chrome or Safari, depending on your platform, open PEP-Easy from pepeasy.pep-web.org. You want to be on the default start screen, so you have a clean workspace.

Then, depending on your mobile device…follow the instructions below:

On IOS:

  1. Tap on the share icon Action navigation bar and tab bar icon
  2. In the bottom list, tap on ‘Add to home screen’
  3. In the “Add to Home” confirmation “bubble”, tap “Add”

On Android:

  1. Tap on the Chrome menu (Vertical Ellipses)
  2. Select “Add to Home Screen” from the menu

 

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Harris, A.J. (2014). Poetic Memory: The Forgotten Self in Plath, Howe, Hinsey, and Gl├╝ck. Uta Gosmann. Madison, New Jersey and Lanham, Maryland: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 2012. 242 pp.. Mod. Psychoanal., 39(1):103-111.
    

(2014). Modern Psychoanalysis, 39(1):103-111

Book Reviews

Poetic Memory: The Forgotten Self in Plath, Howe, Hinsey, and Glück. Uta Gosmann. Madison, New Jersey and Lanham, Maryland: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 2012. 242 pp.

Review by:
Amanda Jeremin Harris

In Poetic Memory: The Forgotten Self in Plath, Howe, Hinsey, and Glück, Uta Gosmann focuses on the ways these four poets make use of “poetic memory,” which she associates to Plotinus's concept of the soul, an entity that possesses more than earthly knowledge. Gosmann compares the poets’ use of poetic memory to the perhaps more culturally apprehensible “historic memory” (which she traces to Plutarch's idea of narrative in identity formation), and she defines her terms (“historic” and “poetic” memory) this way: “What I call ‘historic memory’ presupposes that the self is constituted by the conscious, recollect-able experiences of the past” (p. 1). Further:

Poetic memory, in contrast, posits that the self is more than the compound of a person's remembered biography. Poetic memory does not depend on the accuracy, linearity, causality, or coherence of historic memory, and it reaches beyond the accountable facts of a life toward the notion of a self that is dynamic, expansive, and full of potential. (p.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

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