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PEP-Web Tip of the Day

The Information icon (an i in a circle) will give you valuable information about PEP Web data and features. You can find it besides a PEP Web feature and the author’s name in every journal article. Simply move the mouse pointer over the icon and click on it for the information to appear.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Fabrega, H., Jr. (2010). Understanding the Evolution of Medical Traditions: Brain/Behavior Influences, Enculturation, and the Study of Sickness and Healing. Neuropsychoanalysis, 12(1):21-27.

(2010). Neuropsychoanalysis, 12(1):21-27

Understanding the Evolution of Medical Traditions: Brain/Behavior Influences, Enculturation, and the Study of Sickness and Healing Related Papers

Commentary by
Horacio Fabrega, Jr.

My commentary seeks to expand the relevance of the discussion that Raz & Wolfson so cogently articulate and formulate in two directions: (1) cross-cultural anthropology and (2) evolutionary anthropology and psychology. The “interface problem” is relevant to (1) understanding diverse systems of sickness and healing across human history and culture (i.e., from small-scale societies on through great civilizations of medicine including biomedicine) and (2) differences between mental experience and social behavior including sickness and healing across human biological evolution, a long stretch of time that involved the emergence of conceptual understanding of self, other, and situation and executive functions and working-memory capacity in members of genus Homo and eventually Homo sapiens.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

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