Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To convert articles to PDF…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

At the top right corner of every PEP Web article, there is a button to convert it to PDF. Just click this button and downloading will begin automatically.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Johnson, B. Faraone, S.V. (2013). Outpatient Detoxification Completion and One-Month Outcomes for Opioid Dependence: A Preliminary Study of a Neuropsychoanalytic Treatment in Pain Patients and Addicted Patients. Neuropsychoanalysis, 15(2):145-160.

(2013). Neuropsychoanalysis, 15(2):145-160

Outpatient Detoxification Completion and One-Month Outcomes for Opioid Dependence: A Preliminary Study of a Neuropsychoanalytic Treatment in Pain Patients and Addicted Patients

Brian Johnson and Stephen V. Faraone

The current practice in the United States is to maintain patients with opioid dependence on opioids. A case series approach was used to investigate the results of outpatient detoxification/opioid-free treatment using a neuropsychoanalytic paradigm. Detoxification involved a single dose of buprenorphine, adjunctive medications, and intensive neuropsychoanalytic psychotherapy. Depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and nicotine dependence were treated with bupropion. Low-dose naltrexone was used to remedy hypothesized low endogenous opioid tone. In the study, 92% of subjects completed one week of detoxification. By self-report, 60% were still sober one month into treatment. When divided into a group who met the DSM-IV criteria for opioid dependence because of withdrawal, tolerance, and inability to cut down or stop opioid medications only (the “Pain Group”) and a group who met more than these three criteria (the “Addicted Group”), there were significant differences in maintaining abstinence. In addition, the Addicted Group were much more likely to be depressed and to have borderline personality disorder. All cases of ADHD and all drug dream reports were in the Addicted Group. The conclusion of the study was that neuropsychoanalytic treatment of addiction (including complete abstinence from opioids and neuropsychoanalytic interventions) may be a viable approach to opioid-use disorder. Current DSM criteria for diagnosis of addiction to opioids may incorrectly include a subgroup who are unable to stop the drug only because of inability to endure the withdrawal syndrome. With the neuropsychoanalytic approach, they appear to tolerate withdrawal and stay off opioids. Further investigation is required to compare this neuropsychoanalytic paradigm to other treatments.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2018, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.