Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To see translations of Freud SE or GW…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

When you hover your mouse over a paragraph of the Standard Edition (SE) long enough, the corresponding text from Gesammelte Werke slides from the bottom of the PEP-Web window, and vice versa.

If the slide up window bothers you, you can turn it off by checking the box “Turn off Translations” in the slide-up. But if you’ve turned it off, how do you turn it back on? The option to turn off the translations only is effective for the current session (it uses a stored cookie in your browser). So the easiest way to turn it back on again is to close your browser (all open windows), and reopen it.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Lewin, B.D. (1932). Human Speech. Some Observations, Experiments and Conclusions as to the Nature, Origin, Purpose and Possible Improvement of Human Speech. By Sir Richard Paget, Fellow of the Physical Society of London, Fellow of the Institute of Physics. The International Library of Psychology, Philosophy and Scientific Method. New York: Harcourt, Brace and Company. 1930. 360 p.. Psychoanal Q., 1:350-355.

(1932). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 1:350-355

Human Speech. Some Observations, Experiments and Conclusions as to the Nature, Origin, Purpose and Possible Improvement of Human Speech. By Sir Richard Paget, Fellow of the Physical Society of London, Fellow of the Institute of Physics. The International Library of Psychology, Philosophy and Scientific Method. New York: Harcourt, Brace and Company. 1930. 360 p.

Review by:
Bertram D. Lewin

Sir Richard Paget, the well known physicist, in a book written with distinction, has proved again the old contention that science is one. Beginning with a discussion in the first six chapters of the mechanical principles involved in voice production, he tells us of experimental attempts to apply these principles in the construction of machines to imitate the human voice. From the consideration of these "speaking machines", it was not difficult for the author to come to think of the human organs of speech, and to reflect on what it was that made of these organs, which serve such different purposes in other animals, a "speaking machine".

His theory of the origin of speech is a counterpart of his experimental studies. In these he had been using machines producing motions which imitated speech. His theory of how speech originated, put in briefest terms, is that speech originally imitated motions, particularly bodily motions, and this theory he calls the "gesture theory of language".

The sounds produced by the larynx, the phonational element in speech, make up the emotional part.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2020, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.