Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To copy parts of an article…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

To copy a phrase, paragraph, or large section of an article, highlight the text with the mouse and press Ctrl + C. Then to paste it, go to your text editor and press Ctrl + V.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Grotjahn, M. (1943). The Structure of Obsessions and Compulsions: Paul Schilder. Psychiatry, III, 1940, pp. 549–560.. Psychoanal Q., 12:303.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: The Structure of Obsessions and Compulsions: Paul Schilder. Psychiatry, III, 1940, pp. 549–560.

(1943). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 12:303

The Structure of Obsessions and Compulsions: Paul Schilder. Psychiatry, III, 1940, pp. 549–560.

Martin Grotjahn

Freud states that the system of conscious experience has perception and motility as its basis and that access to motility is through consciousness. Consciousness and motility are the nucleus of the ego in the psychoanalytic sense. Psychoanalysis has given attention to the more complicated functions of the ego and has neglected the study of primitive motor function in connection with problems of the ego. The work of Jelliffe and Stengel is an exception to this general neglect of organic motor functions. The general psychoanalytic literature as, for instance, the recent papers of Federn, Bergler, and Goldman, does not sufficiently emphasize the relationship of motor problems to obsessions and compulsions. The more general discussions of Nunberg and Fenichel mention Freud's fundamental description of the defense reactions in obsessional neurosisisolation and undoing—but do not stress the motor elements in the psychology of obsessional neurotics. According to Schilder, about one-third of the obsessive and compulsive patients show organic signs pointing to pathology with the same localization as that found in encephalitis.1 For therapeutic purposes the full armamentarium of psychoanalytic technique must be used and the patient must be shown in every instance how the content of his experiences are the expression of defense mechanisms. It is necessary that the patient does not conceive of his motor drives as isolated phenomena but as a part of a total situation between him, his love objects of the past, and society.

—————————————

1 Amer. J. of Psychiatry, XCIV, 1938, pp. 1397–1413.

- 303 -

Article Citation

Grotjahn, M. (1943). The Structure of Obsessions and Compulsions. Psychoanal. Q., 12:303

Copyright © 2019, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.