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Garma, A. (1943). Don Quixote Y Sancho Panza Como Tipos PsycholĂłgicos. (Don Quixote and Sancho Panza as Psychological Types.): Walter Blumenfeld. Rivista de las Indias, 2a, 38, 1942.. Psychoanal Q., 12:450.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Don Quixote Y Sancho Panza Como Tipos Psychológicos. (Don Quixote and Sancho Panza as Psychological Types.): Walter Blumenfeld. Rivista de las Indias, 2a, 38, 1942.

(1943). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 12:450

Don Quixote Y Sancho Panza Como Tipos Psychológicos. (Don Quixote and Sancho Panza as Psychological Types.): Walter Blumenfeld. Rivista de las Indias, 2a, 38, 1942.

Angel Garma

Blumenfeld starts by contrasting the psychological types represented by Don Quixote and Sancho Panza by comparing their respective interests in remote and near-by things. A more detailed psychological study, however, shows these contradictory attitudes to be two methods of handling the same difficulties. The main point in Blumenfeld's 'detailed psychological study' is the interpretation of Don Quixote's dreams in the cave of Montecinos. Don Quixote, according to the author, is characterized by a conflict between an immense ambition and the fact that he is actually poor and decrepit and unable to satisfy the needs of his girl whose inclinations are of the courtesan type. Don Quixote's psychosis decreases the mental tension rooted in his conflict; in obedience to a severe superego, it changes the sexual love of which Don Quixote is afraid into a platonic one. The rather ridiculous and masochistic character of the knightly adventures also contains a jibing component against this superego.

Psychiatrically, Sancho Panza is to be looked upon as a case of folie à deux. He represents a kind of double of Don Quixote. To obey his superego (represented by Don Quixote) he renounces all genital pleasures by leaving his wife and regresses to pregenitality. His apparent stupidity is of the type of pseudodebility, and brings him several advantages.

Blumenfeld's paper stresses in a very interesting way certain elements in Don Quixote's story which have not been properly recognized by previous authors. Helene Deutsch's paper on Don Quixote1 is not quoted.

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Article Citation

Garma, A. (1943). Don Quixote Y Sancho Panza Como Tipos Psychológicos. (Don Quixote and Sancho Panza as Psychological Types.). Psychoanal. Q., 12:450

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