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Eisendorfer, A. (1944). The Therapy of the Neuroses and Psychoses. A Socio-Psychobiologic Analysis and Resynthesis: By Samuel Henry Kraines, M.D. Philadelphia: Lea & Febiger, 1941. 512 pp.. Psychoanal Q., 13:102-104.

(1944). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 13:102-104

The Therapy of the Neuroses and Psychoses. A Socio-Psychobiologic Analysis and Resynthesis: By Samuel Henry Kraines, M.D. Philadelphia: Lea & Febiger, 1941. 512 pp.

Review by:
Arnold Eisendorfer

In the preface, the author states that 'the second step in the science of psychiatry was made when Sigmund Freud brought forth in organized fashion the unconscious and the dynamic activity of human thought and emotions'. All psychiatry today has been influenced by his dynamic concept. The author goes on to state that he has 'made an attempt to separate the chaff from the wheat', and 'to give as much of the school of psychoanalysis as is of logical and practical value'.

The book has the limitations of those who refuse to integrate into their clinical approach the fundamental concepts of the dynamic psychology of the unconscious, or are incapable of doing so. The text and the case studies are lacking in 'the basic concepts of the unconscious in disease', and it is difficult to comprehend how with these limitations the author can pretend to pass judgment upon what he considers to be 'the extremely fanciful superstructure of psychoanalysis'. His concept of the 'basic concepts of the unconscious' is not clear. He states that 'certain underlying attitudes, because of irritations which have existed since early childhood may continue to exist … these irritations are spoken of as being unconscious. Yet these unconscious memories may be elicited by conscious discussion with the patient as well as by other techniques.'

The sociopsychobiological resynthesis, impelled by the author's resistance to the unconscious, resolves itself essentially into 'removing the stress', 'removing the patient from stress' and 'common sense advice on how to deal with stress'.

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