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PEP-Web Tip of the Day

To start PEP-Easy without first opening your browser–just as you would start a mobile app, you can save a shortcut to your home screen.

First, in Chrome or Safari, depending on your platform, open PEP-Easy from pepeasy.pep-web.org.  You want to be on the default start screen, so you have a clean workspace.

Then, depending on your mobile device…follow the instructions below:

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On Android:

  1. Tap on the Chrome menu (Vertical Ellipses)
  2. Select “Add to Home Screen” from the menu

 

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Ross, N. (1944). Introduction to the Psychoanalytic Theory of the Libido: By Richard Sterba. New York: Nervous and Mental Disease Monographs (No. 68), 1942. 81 pp.. Psychoanal Q., 13:222.

(1944). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 13:222

Introduction to the Psychoanalytic Theory of the Libido: By Richard Sterba. New York: Nervous and Mental Disease Monographs (No. 68), 1942. 81 pp.

Review by:
Nathaniel Ross

In his preface, Dr. Sterba proclaims the timeliness of a recapitulation of Freud's theory of the instincts, in the face of the all too familiar assaults made upon it in recent years. With such a militant foreword one might expect a somewhat polemical account of the libido theory, but this is not at all the case.

Actually, this well-condensed work should prove of sound pedagogical value, for it presents the classic findings of the instinct theory with simplicity and a positiveness born of complete conviction. It is not for the relatively uninformed laity, whose rôle as an audience to the controversy is referred to in the preface, nor yet for those qualified to enter the lists as seasoned adversaries. As a simple restatement it will hardly convince those who do not accept the libido theory, nor add to the armament of those who do. In a word, if the author had stated his intention of simply compiling a student's text, one could find as little fault with his purpose as with its execution.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

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