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PEP-Easy Tip: To save PEP-Easy to the home screen

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

To start PEP-Easy without first opening your browser–just as you would start a mobile app, you can save a shortcut to your home screen.

First, in Chrome or Safari, depending on your platform, open PEP-Easy from pepeasy.pep-web.org. You want to be on the default start screen, so you have a clean workspace.

Then, depending on your mobile device…follow the instructions below:

On IOS:

  1. Tap on the share icon Action navigation bar and tab bar icon
  2. In the bottom list, tap on ‘Add to home screen’
  3. In the “Add to Home” confirmation “bubble”, tap “Add”

On Android:

  1. Tap on the Chrome menu (Vertical Ellipses)
  2. Select “Add to Home Screen” from the menu

 

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Entenman, E. (1944). Children's Behavior Problems: Volume II. Relative Importance and Interrelations Among Traits. By Luton Ackerson. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1942. 570 pp.. Psychoanal Q., 13:387-387.
   

(1944). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 13:387-387

Children's Behavior Problems: Volume II. Relative Importance and Interrelations Among Traits. By Luton Ackerson. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1942. 570 pp.

Review by:
Edith Entenman

Children's Behavior Problems is a statistical study of hundreds of children's cases examined consecutively at the Illinois Institute for Juvenile Research to investigate the causal factors underlying undesirable behavior manifestations.

The principle of multiple causality is the basis on which the author has proceeded. It was assumed that behavior traits are correlated with a large number of possible etiological factors, either inherent in the child or arising in his environment, and that these contributing factors are of differing degrees of etiological potency. The behavior traits studied were chosen on the basis of how frequently they were noted, rather than according to any current belief concerning their relative importance.

The author feels that effective methods of treatment have often been discovered by chance, with little understanding of etiology. It seems to have been his hope that this extensive statistical study of the correlations between traits and possible etiological factors might lead directly to the development of practical methods of treatment or prevention, even though a complete knowledge of the underlying causal mechanisms is lacking.

Dr. Ackerson has undertaken a tremendous task which will undoubtedly interest those who work with statistics.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

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