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W., H. (1949). The Development of Psychoanalytic Criminology: Geza Dukes. Int. J. Psa., XXVII, 1946, pp. 145–151.. Psychoanal Q., 18:123.

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Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: The Development of Psychoanalytic Criminology: Geza Dukes. Int. J. Psa., XXVII, 1946, pp. 145–151.

(1949). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 18:123

The Development of Psychoanalytic Criminology: Geza Dukes. Int. J. Psa., XXVII, 1946, pp. 145–151.

H. W.

In this paper, published in Budapest in 1933, Dukes distinguishes between the 'normal' or 'genuine' criminal—evidently the truly psychopathic personality—which he considers 'an unsolved problem', and the 'neurotic criminal' whose attitudes and actions can be traced to childhood conflicts. He describes and discusses, with some clarity, multiple aspects of the growth of psychoanalytic insight into the unconscious motives of neurotic criminals, from Storfer's first study in 1911, The Unique Position of the Parricide, to Reik's The Unknown Murderer written in 1932. Dukes ends with a plea for the abandonment of punishment for such criminals—which is usually effective only in stimulating them to further crime—in favor of psychoanalytically oriented treatment and early preventive therapy. He notes that Aichhorn has been doing this type of re-education for years (before 1933) at the Viennese Juvenile Guidance Clinic.


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Article Citation

W., H. (1949). The Development of Psychoanalytic Criminology. Psychoanal. Q., 18:123

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WARNING! This text is printed for the personal use of the subscriber to PEP Web and is copyright to the Journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to copy, distribute or circulate it in any form whatsoever.