Login
(1949). Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology. XLII, 1947: The Use of Relaxation in Short-Term Psychotherapy. Gerald R. Pascal. Pp. 226–242.. Psychoanal Q., 18:410.

Welcome to PEP Web!

Viewing the full text of this document requires a subscription to PEP Web.

If you are coming in from a university from a registered IP address or secure referral page you should not need to log in. Contact your university librarian in the event of problems.

If you have a personal subscription on your own account or through a Society or Institute please put your username and password in the box below. Any difficulties should be reported to your group administrator.

Username:
Password:

Can't remember your username and/or password? If you have forgotten your username and/or password please click here and log in to the PaDS database. Once there you need to fill in your email address (this must be the email address that PEP has on record for you) and click "Send." Your username and password will be sent to this email address within a few minutes. If this does not work for you please contact your group organizer.

Athens or federation user? Login here.

Not already a subscriber? Order a subscription today.

Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology. XLII, 1947: The Use of Relaxation in Short-Term Psychotherapy. Gerald R. Pascal. Pp. 226–242.

(1949). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 18:410

Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology. XLII, 1947: The Use of Relaxation in Short-Term Psychotherapy. Gerald R. Pascal. Pp. 226–242.

Pascal summarizes his experience with a psychotherapeutic technique applied to twelve neurotics in an army setting, briefly reviewing the course of psychotherapy with five of them. The two high lights of his technique were to encourage a feeling of participation, of 'democracy', in the therapeutic relationship, and to use a method of inducing relaxation in his patient. The spirit of participation was fostered by stressing the voluntarily coöperative aspect of receiving treatment and giving information to the therapist, the joint nature of decisions, and the therapist's reliance on the patient to help him track down etiological factors. The technique of inducing relaxation, similar to that of inducing hypnosis, is described. Once relaxed, the patient is helped by suggestive directions to relive critical emotional experiences and to recover repressed memories. 'Simple relaxation seems to be sufficiently far along on the hypnotic continuum to facilitate recall and to increase the suggestibility of the patient.' The technique is recommended as useful when relief from symptoms, based on partial insight, is as ambitious a therapeutic goal as circumstances (army setting) allow.


WARNING! This text is printed for the personal use of the PEPWeb subscriber and is copyright to the Journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to copy, distribute or circulate it in any form.
- 410 -

Article Citation

(1949). Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology. XLII, 1947. Psychoanal. Q., 18:410

Copyright © 2014, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing. Help | About | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Problem

WARNING! This text is printed for the personal use of the subscriber to PEP Web and is copyright to the Journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to copy, distribute or circulate it in any form whatsoever.