Login
(1949). Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic. XIII, 1949: The Cultural Significance of the Changed Attitude Toward Work in Great Britain. W. N. Evans. Pp. 1–8.. Psychoanal Q., 18:532-532.

Welcome to PEP Web!

Viewing the full text of this document requires a subscription to PEP Web.

If you are coming in from a university from a registered IP address or secure referral page you should not need to log in. Contact your university librarian in the event of problems.

If you have a personal subscription on your own account or through a Society or Institute please put your username and password in the box below. Any difficulties should be reported to your group administrator.

Username:
Password:

Can't remember your username and/or password? If you have forgotten your username and/or password please click here and log in to the PaDS database. Once there you need to fill in your email address (this must be the email address that PEP has on record for you) and click "Send." Your username and password will be sent to this email address within a few minutes. If this does not work for you please contact your group organizer.

Athens or federation user? Login here.

Not already a subscriber? Order a subscription today.

Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic. XIII, 1949: The Cultural Significance of the Changed Attitude Toward Work in Great Britain. W. N. Evans. Pp. 1–8.

(1949). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 18:532-532

Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic. XIII, 1949: The Cultural Significance of the Changed Attitude Toward Work in Great Britain. W. N. Evans. Pp. 1–8.

In this paper Evans attempts to analyze the factors responsible for the new sociological position of the working classes and the leisure classes in Great Britain. Whereas the gentleman of leisure was once considered the cultural ideal, he is now stigmatized as a 'drone'. The producing classes are now seen as warriors in the battle of production.

The author traces historically the traditional attitudes toward work. He believes that the teachings of Plato and Aristotle were an important influence in creating contempt for the workers who, in that society, were women, slaves or enemy aliens. He quotes from philology many examples of words associated with manual occupations, all of which have a sinister implication: 'crafty', 'designing', 'artful'.

Particular emphasis is placed on the fact that technical and manual activities were originally the realm of women. Work became despised because it became associated with the castrated person—the woman. The change of this attitude in Britain may be regarded as the last chapter of European history as we understood it in the past.


WARNING! This text is printed for the personal use of the PEPWeb subscriber and is copyright to the Journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to copy, distribute or circulate it in any form.
- 532 -

Article Citation

(1949). Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic. XIII, 1949. Psychoanal. Q., 18:532-532

Copyright © 2014, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing. Help | About | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Problem

WARNING! This text is printed for the personal use of the subscriber to PEP Web and is copyright to the Journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to copy, distribute or circulate it in any form whatsoever.