Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To keep track of most popular articles…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

You can always keep track of the Most Popular Journal Articles on PEP Web by checking the PEP tab found on the homepage.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Murphy, W.F. (1954). International Journal of Psychoanalysis. XXXIII, 1952: Patients Who Sleep or Look at the Psychoanalyst During Treatment—Technical Considerations. W. Clifford M. Scott. Pp. 465-469.. Psychoanal Q., 23:146-147.
    
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: International Journal of Psychoanalysis. XXXIII, 1952: Patients Who Sleep or Look at the Psychoanalyst During Treatment—Technical Considerations. W. Clifford M. Scott. Pp. 465-469.

(1954). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 23:146-147

International Journal of Psychoanalysis. XXXIII, 1952: Patients Who Sleep or Look at the Psychoanalyst During Treatment—Technical Considerations. W. Clifford M. Scott. Pp. 465-469.

William F. Murphy

The author's observations and a review of the literature lead him to conclude that sleeping or sleepiness during analysis is a regressive defense which reactivates primary conflicts over the wish to sleep. Analysis of this defense may result not only in better nocturnal sleep but also, for a while, increased sleeping during the analytic sessions. States of blankness, or 'nothing to talk about' are often defenses against a wish to sleep. The aim of the impulse is most easily determined by associations to the question, 'If you slept, how would you like to be wakened?' The state of waking is allied with omnipotent creative wishes and

- 146 -

should be studied more in detail. Sleep dreams may be defenses against immediate sensory experiences such as occur going to sleep or waking. The associative material recurrently leads to a wish to look at, touch, or have the analyst. In a case of the author's, analysis of sleep as a defense led to primary oral deprivations' becoming conscious and to what appeared to be a primary sleep and wake wish.

Waking and looking are usually connected with anxieties concerning the body surface and the inner situation, and with the acting out of desires, such as touching. Analysis of these wishes may also lead to more looking, for a while, but also to more progress. Looking may serve to avoid remembering or verbalizing, or may symbolize eating or vomiting. Mutual looking fantasies may be substituted for kissing or fighting. The author concludes that greater use of movement and posture analysis may increase the speed and depth of analysis and help to prevent the occasional long-term regressions that occur during psychoanalytic treatment.

- 147 -

Article Citation

Murphy, W.F. (1954). International Journal of Psychoanalysis. XXXIII, 1952. Psychoanal. Q., 23:146-147

Copyright © 2020, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.