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Hunt, S.P. (1955). International Journal of Psychoanalysis. XXXIV, 1953: Some Observations on a Case of Vertigo. Charles Rycroft. Pp. 241-247.. Psychoanal Q., 24:150-151.
   
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: International Journal of Psychoanalysis. XXXIV, 1953: Some Observations on a Case of Vertigo. Charles Rycroft. Pp. 241-247.

(1955). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 24:150-151

International Journal of Psychoanalysis. XXXIV, 1953: Some Observations on a Case of Vertigo. Charles Rycroft. Pp. 241-247.

Samuel P. Hunt

This paper purports to be 'an essay on the presentation of clinical material'. It consists of several general comments on vertigo, a very sketchy history of a neurotic man of forty-five who had recently acquired Ménière's syndrome, and a number of deductive statements that describe the patient's character and demonstrate the psychodynamics of the attacks of vertigo. These statements are as follows: 1. Certain psychological conditions made it possible for the attacks of vertigo to occur. (What the conditions were is not clear.) 2. There were strong counterphobic defenses against locomotor anxiety. 3. The patient's compulsive masturbation was related to his interest in motion. 4. The neurosis was a passive defense against sadistic wishes, with fantasies of oral incorporation and expulsion of the bad internal mother. There were also defenses against passive dependent oral wishes for union with the breast. 5. The attacks of vertigo gave vent to repressed aggression against the internal mother by a 'black-out' of rage.

Specific attention is directed only to primitive orality, although the author

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hints at the existence of oepidal conflicts. (He attributes the onset of the attacks of vertigo to a conflict over aggression against the father.) He offers no clinical evidence to connect the primitive oral ambivalence and the forces opposing it, or to support the contention that the oral sadism was primary and independent of real objects and experience. He does not discuss the possibility that the patient produced the guilt-free oral sadistic and oral dependent fantasies and dreams partly to please the analyst.

The nature of psychoanalytic evidence makes it difficult to present convincing clinical evidence to support any hypothesis. In this paper the clinical material is particularly scarce. The connections between theory and data are loose and unclear, and there is no follow-up report.

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Article Citation

Hunt, S.P. (1955). International Journal of Psychoanalysis. XXXIV, 1953. Psychoanal. Q., 24:150-151

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