Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
PEP-Easy Tip: To save PEP-Easy to the home screen

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

To start PEP-Easy without first opening your browser–just as you would start a mobile app, you can save a shortcut to your home screen.

First, in Chrome or Safari, depending on your platform, open PEP-Easy from pepeasy.pep-web.org. You want to be on the default start screen, so you have a clean workspace.

Then, depending on your mobile device…follow the instructions below:

On IOS:

  1. Tap on the share icon Action navigation bar and tab bar icon
  2. In the bottom list, tap on ‘Add to home screen’
  3. In the “Add to Home” confirmation “bubble”, tap “Add”

On Android:

  1. Tap on the Chrome menu (Vertical Ellipses)
  2. Select “Add to Home Screen” from the menu

 

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

(1955). International Journal of Group Psychotherapy. III, 1953: On Different Types of Countertransference. Joachim Flescher. Pp. 357-372.. Psychoanal Q., 24:162.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: International Journal of Group Psychotherapy. III, 1953: On Different Types of Countertransference. Joachim Flescher. Pp. 357-372.

(1955). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 24:162

International Journal of Group Psychotherapy. III, 1953: On Different Types of Countertransference. Joachim Flescher. Pp. 357-372.

The therapist may project images from his own past onto the patient, may act out in the treatment, or may show a counterpart of the transference, 'an empathic identification with the analysand'; or countertransference may include all the analyst's unconscious needs and conflicts that influence his understanding or technique.

In defensive countertransference, the therapist uses his own defenses in treatment. He may, for example, make masochistic identification of himself with the patient; treatment may revive the therapist's Oedipal anxieties because the patient as a love object is taboo; or it may arouse the therapist's fear of aggression or his self-punishing tendencies. He may see the patient as a representative of his own id, or he may project his own superego onto the patient. Treatment may cause the therapist to be disturbed over the vulnerability of his ego ideal.

Reactive countertransference is the response, often entirely conscious, to strong emotions directed to the therapist, especially to sadism and aggression. Or it may be the reaction to a personal quality of the patient, such as personal unattractiveness, and is often carried from one patient to the next.

Induced or suggested countertransference is the therapist's response to the patient's wish to see him in a given role. Here the personality of the analyst counts less than the strongly cathected fantasy.

- 162 -

Article Citation

(1955). International Journal of Group Psychotherapy. III, 1953. Psychoanal. Q., 24:162

Copyright © 2020, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.