Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: Downloads should look similar to the originals…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

Downloadable content in PDF and ePUB was designed to be read in a similar format to the original articles.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Burnett, R. (1956). The Clinical Interview. Vol. I: Diagnosis. 612 Pp. Vol. II: Therapy. 335 Pp. By Felix Deutsch, M.D. and William F. Murphy, M.D. New York: International Universities Press, Inc., 1954, 1955.. Psychoanal Q., 25:88-91.

(1956). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 25:88-91

The Clinical Interview. Vol. I: Diagnosis. 612 Pp. Vol. II: Therapy. 335 Pp. By Felix Deutsch, M.D. and William F. Murphy, M.D. New York: International Universities Press, Inc., 1954, 1955.

Review by:
Richard Burnett

In these volumes, Dr. Deutsch and Dr. Murphy present a technique of associative exploration and psychotherapy and their method of teaching it. The work was begun by Dr. Deutsch, motivated at first by his interest in research into psychosomatic conditions, and later his teaching at Washington University. More recently it has been further developed by both authors in their resident training programs at the Boston and Cushing Veterans Administration Hospitals as a response to the increasing demands of psychiatric residents for applicable psychoanalytic knowledge, particularly since the end of World War II. The bulk of these volumes is composed of verbatim recordings of clinical interviews conducted at the latter institutions. Italicized interpretative and explanatory comments are scattered parenthetically, with good use of 'hindsight', throughout the texts of the interviews at appropriate places. In addition there are three chapters on theory and one devoted to criticism and conclusions.

A wide variety of symptom complexes and psychodynamic constellations are alluded to in the chapter headings of the clinical material; but from a structural point of view, most of the cases would seem to fall near the narcissistic end of the diagnostic scale, i.e., psychosomatic and 'borderline' conditions. This fact accounts for the authors' belief that otherwise unsupportable theoretical generalizations are documented in the clinical material, e.g., 1, that 'symptom removal is achieved without marked personality changes, and very often with by-passing the resistances'; 2, that actively fostered 'narcissistic identification' of patient with therapist, inadequately distinguished from object-libidinous aspects of transference, is seen as being always therapeutically useful rather than as a resistance.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2020, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.