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(1956). Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic. XVIII, 1954: Selecting Psychiatric Residents: Survey of the Topeka Research. Lester Lubarsky. Pp. 252-259.. Psychoanal Q., 25:117-118.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic. XVIII, 1954: Selecting Psychiatric Residents: Survey of the Topeka Research. Lester Lubarsky. Pp. 252-259.

(1956). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 25:117-118

Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic. XVIII, 1954: Selecting Psychiatric Residents: Survey of the Topeka Research. Lester Lubarsky. Pp. 252-259.

This follow-up study of the selection of residents in Topeka produced several conclusions. The appraisal of three interviewers is about as accurate as appraisal derived from psychological tests. Appraisal by a single interviewer is unsatisfactory and but little more useful than selection by chance. Two interviewers were better than one and three than two; apparently they tend to cancel out and compensate for each other's errors. The accuracy of prediction has no clear relationship to the age or experience of the interviewer. There is a tendency to underestimate applicants who show much anxiety or aggressiveness and to overestimate those who show evidence of cultural attainments. No single procedure was found that can supplant or consistently improve the interviewer's clinical

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judgment. A curious finding was that the interviewer's degree of liking for each candidate is a better guide to choosing men who will do good psychiatric work than is the interviewer's explicit prediction of competence. It appeared that those interviewers who are poorest in selecting are those who are themselves least talented and competent in psychiatry. No single type of personality makes the best resident. Among those who turned out successfully, there were wide differences in personality and sociocultural background. It was found that after working a while with a man, the staff can more easily agree on his qualities than when they first see him. Not one applicant over the age of thirty-eight was rated 'above average'; the age in itself is probably not so important as the significance of changing specialties in middle age. Some residents improved surprisingly during training. About a quarter of the residents obtained psychiatric treatment during their residency and many more thereafter.

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Article Citation

(1956). Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic. XVIII, 1954. Psychoanal. Q., 25:117-118

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