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Rahman, L. (1956). Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic. XVIII, 1954: The Perception Project: Progress Report for 1953-1954. George S. Klein, Philip S. Holzman, and Diana Laskin. Pp. 260-266.. Psychoanal Q., 25:118.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic. XVIII, 1954: The Perception Project: Progress Report for 1953-1954. George S. Klein, Philip S. Holzman, and Diana Laskin. Pp. 260-266.

(1956). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 25:118

Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic. XVIII, 1954: The Perception Project: Progress Report for 1953-1954. George S. Klein, Philip S. Holzman, and Diana Laskin. Pp. 260-266.

Lincoln Rahman

An objective of the perception project is the formulation of regulative principles of personality as they appear in cognitive behavior. It is assumed that cognitive attitudes produce the consistencies of a person's thought and of his manner of perceiving the environment. The stability of cognitive attitudes is to be tested over a period of time. Another project is a study of individual differences in the effects produced by a state of need—thirst, for example—upon cognitive behavior, and the function of cognitive controls for the delay and discharge of need-tension. Experiments demonstrate that the effects of a need are distinctly different when cognitive attitudes and adaptive problems vary. These and other studies suggest that defense is only one form of a wide variety of controls that condition the workings of need, drive, and behavior. Those aspects of perceptual processes that analysts currently view as 'autonomous' appear to be idiosyncratically organized in different people into different 'styles' of reacting or different regulative principles. Individual differences in sensory thresholds are to be studied to learn whether adjustive requirements of the organism are reflected in changes in threshold sensitivity.

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Article Citation

Rahman, L. (1956). Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic. XVIII, 1954. Psychoanal. Q., 25:118

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