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After you perform a search, you can sort the articles by Source. This will rearrange the results of your search, displaying articles according to their appearance in journals and books. This feature is useful for tracing psychoanalytic concepts in a specific psychoanalytic tradition.

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Friedman, P. (1956). Suicide in London. An Ecological Study: By Peter Sainsbury, M.D. Maudsley Monographs, No. 1. Published for The Institute of Psychiatry by Chapman & Hall Ltd., London, 1955. 116 pp.. Psychoanal Q., 25:431-433.

(1956). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 25:431-433

Suicide in London. An Ecological Study: By Peter Sainsbury, M.D. Maudsley Monographs, No. 1. Published for The Institute of Psychiatry by Chapman & Hall Ltd., London, 1955. 116 pp.

Review by:
Paul Friedman

This is a sociological study in which the differences in the suicide rates of various neighborhoods and social groups in London are examined and interpreted in terms of their social and cultural structure. It aims to provide 'an objective body of fact regarding the social conditions that engender suicide or suicidal inclinations in a group', resulting in 'data on which a practical program of mental hygiene may be based'. The study consists of two complementary parts: first, a statistical correlation of suicide rates in the twenty-eight Metropolitan Boroughs and the City, with selected indices of their social characteristics; second, an analysis of social and other facts pertaining to four hundred nine cases of suicide reported to the coroner for North London during a three-year period, serving to validate the statistical correlations and to determine whether they reveal a causal relationship.

The findings showed high social mobility and its concomitant, social isolation, to be the conditions most conducive to suicide. Social isolation here encompasses a variety of situations beside that of the lonely boardinghouse dweller: unemployment, with its implication of social rejection; the solitude of the aged, lacking contemporaries who share the same values; the immigrant's difficulty of adjusting to an unfamiliar culture as well as the nouveau riche's floundering in a new and unaccustomed milieu, etc. As to the complex relation between economic status and suicide, the data strikingly demonstrate that indigenous poverty does not foster suicide; its occurrence in the lower economic groups could largely be correlated with the loss of status.

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