Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: You can access over 100 digitized books…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

Did you know that currently we have more than 100 digitized books available for you to read? You can find them in the Books Section.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

(1960). Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association. V, 1957: Communication in Psychoanalysis and the Creative Process: A Parallel. David Beres. Pp. 408-423.. Psychoanal Q., 29:283.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association. V, 1957: Communication in Psychoanalysis and the Creative Process: A Parallel. David Beres. Pp. 408-423.

(1960). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 29:283

Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association. V, 1957: Communication in Psychoanalysis and the Creative Process: A Parallel. David Beres. Pp. 408-423.

Controlled regression in psychoanalysis results in emergence of the primary process in the initial phase of analysis and is compared to inspiration in the artist. This passive phase must be followed by active elaboration in order to 'tame the chaos' with the synthetic function of the ego. Both the artist and the analysand need distance (dissociation) for observation, yet in both the emotion must be recollected and relived. The path from the unconscious to consciousness in treatment is viewed as a growing toleration of id drives through the transference and identification with the doctor, and through superego changes. The poet uses his 'skill' to effect unconscious expression. Beres sees much in common in analytic productions, art, and myths, and uses excellent quotations from poets to demonstrate this. In addition to the ego's desire to objectify, Beres views the need for communication as the need to relieve guilt and anxiety through sharing of fantasies. Art is communication of an emotional experience which re-creates the experience in the audience. The patient and the artist both need an audience for expression of fantasies, synthesis of fantasies, and conviction of the truth behind them. The analyst is seen as an active audience creating in his mind the images and affects of the patient, and must, like the poet, keep the images and emotions controlled within the demands of the ego. Interpretation is seen as re-enforcing the synthetic function of the patient's ego. Analysis must go beyond art and involve conscious awareness as well as experience, whereas art is felt but not understood. Without the equivalent of the æsthetic experience in treatment there is no conviction. This requires communication, but communication does not explain the treatment. In art 'communication achieves its most human expression, the transmission of emotion, and this quality is shared in psychoanalysis … [and] is an essential part of the creative process that comprises both'.

- 283 -

Article Citation

(1960). Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association. V, 1957. Psychoanal. Q., 29:283

Copyright © 2021, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.