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After you perform a search, you can sort the articles by Source. This will rearrange the results of your search, displaying articles according to their appearance in journals and books. This feature is useful for tracing psychoanalytic concepts in a specific psychoanalytic tradition.

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Engle, B. (1960). Psychiatric Quarterly. XXXIII, 1959: A Second Contribution to the Study of the Narcissistic Mortification. Ludwig Eidelberg. Pp. 636-646.. Psychoanal Q., 29:436-437.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Psychiatric Quarterly. XXXIII, 1959: A Second Contribution to the Study of the Narcissistic Mortification. Ludwig Eidelberg. Pp. 636-646.

(1960). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 29:436-437

Psychiatric Quarterly. XXXIII, 1959: A Second Contribution to the Study of the Narcissistic Mortification. Ludwig Eidelberg. Pp. 636-646.

Bernice Engle

Eidelberg discusses an aspect overlooked in his earlier reports on the narcissistic mortification. The phenomenon is due to the power of somebody else who thereby uses one against his will; and the 'somebody else' may be external or internal—that is, one part of the personality can 'force the total personality to do what it resents'.

Excerpts from a case history illustrate the problem of a male patient suffering from paranoid ideas. After he had given up his insistence that others hated him, he still believed that characterologically he must continue to suspect everybody of hating him. Slowly and painfully he then came to see his need to accept his conviction of the analyst's hatred of him and of his inability to do anything

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about it. Such an idea protected him from recognizing his self-hatred and his conviction of inability to control it. Consciously he came to recognize his self-hatred as a destructive, primitive self-criticism, and to understand how his fear of being unable to control his aggression sprang from 'the unconscious fear of having to face and accept his sexual needs'. He feared his love more than his hate. The patient's projection of 'he hates me' thus included an acceptance of an external narcissistic mortification—'he can hurt me'; and a denial of his inability to control his self-hatred. 'The truth is, not that I cannot control my aggression, but that I cannot control his', helped the patient to 'deny his failure to control his own sexual wishes…'.

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Article Citation

Engle, B. (1960). Psychiatric Quarterly. XXXIII, 1959. Psychoanal. Q., 29:436-437

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