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(1960). Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology. LVIII, 1959: A General Formula for the Quantitative Treatment of Human Motivation. Walter Toman. Pp. 91-99.. Psychoanal Q., 29:440-441.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology. LVIII, 1959: A General Formula for the Quantitative Treatment of Human Motivation. Walter Toman. Pp. 91-99.

(1960). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 29:440-441

Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology. LVIII, 1959: A General Formula for the Quantitative Treatment of Human Motivation. Walter Toman. Pp. 91-99.

All of a person's motives are forever on the increase from the moment they were last satisfied until they are satisfied again. But various degrees of satisfaction reduce motive intensities by corresponding amounts. The level of a person's motivational development may be inferred, in comparative terms, through the use of a quantitative formula. This formula translated into words is that the sum of intensity increments of motives that can be distinguished within a given person at a given time of development is equal to a constant. An assumption is

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that the number of distinguishable motives increases with development. Therefore, the intensity increments with which any given motive grows until it is once more satisfied must, on the whole, decrease with development. Major aspects of the formula were subjected to empirical tests and proved by these tests to be feasible. The formula articulates considerations by which the clinician implicitly proceeds. Repeated inspection of a few motives may tell whether a person is continuing to grow, beginning to slow up, or even regressing, and may suggest psychopathology before a person shows more conspicuous symptoms.

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Article Citation

(1960). Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology. LVIII, 1959. Psychoanal. Q., 29:440-441

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