Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To quickly return to the issue’s Table of Contents from an article…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

You can go back to to the issue’s Table of Contents in one click by clicking on the article title in the article view. What’s more, it will take you to the specific place in the TOC where the article appears.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

(1960). Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association. VII, 1959: Consciousness in Psychoanalytic Theory: Some Implications for Current Research in Perception. George S. Klein. Pp. 5-34.. Psychoanal Q., 29:588.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association. VII, 1959: Consciousness in Psychoanalytic Theory: Some Implications for Current Research in Perception. George S. Klein. Pp. 5-34.

(1960). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 29:588

Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association. VII, 1959: Consciousness in Psychoanalytic Theory: Some Implications for Current Research in Perception. George S. Klein. Pp. 5-34.

The crucial importance of a theory of perception for a general psychoanalytic psychology was recognized by Freud and responded to in part by Hartmann and Rapaport. Klein draws upon old and recent research in subliminal perception, from Binet and Pötzl to Fisher and his own contributions, to demonstrate the extent and depth of consciously unnoticed registrations. These data indicate that 'consciousness' subsumes a wide range of variations of awareness, plus a wide range of difference in the modes of experiencing this awareness. The author stresses the following. 1. Registration and perception involve distinct and different processes. Registration is extraordinarily encompassing and nonselective; perception is highly selective and structuring. 2. Perceptions are distinct qualities, experiences of being in contact with things as they are; registrations must be enhanced with an additional cathectic quality to become perceptions. 3. The state of consciousness is crucial in determining the structures of perceptions and registrations, in determining how registrations are worked over and organized. Evidence cited indicates that registrations inaccessible as perceptions in the 'waking state' are recoverable as perceptions in a dream, or as images in those special modifications of the waking state in which reality contact and reality investment are minimized. These subliminal registrations are incorporated into a variety of schemata, subject to transformation either on primary or secondary process terms, as determined by the controlling structures that characterize the state of consciousness at the moment. Thus the 'waking state' favors perceptions that reflect schemata adaptively consonant with reality, while still permitting more primary process influence upon waking imagery. Awareness achieves efficiency and economy of cathectic expenditure at the cost of wider encompassing of external reality. The implications of this to creativity and the artist are reviewed. Reactions to registration and to perception can occur on different levels, and the participation of the primary process in cognitive activity can potentially occur at all levels if in different states of consciousness. Laws of perception based on the alert, purposeful, highly motivated perceiving of the academic laboratory probably are valid only for this kind of consciousness which utilizes preponderantly secondary process, and may not be applicable to other states of consciousness in which primary process modes are predominant.

- 588 -

Article Citation

(1960). Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association. VII, 1959. Psychoanal. Q., 29:588

Copyright © 2021, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.