Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To save a shortcut to an article to your desktop…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

The way you save a shortcut to an article on your desktop depends on what internet browser (and device) you are using.

  • Safari
  • Chrome
  • Internet Explorer
  • Opera

 

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

(1960). Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association. VII, 1959: The Self-Representation, Anality, and the Fear of Dying. Bernard Brodsky. Pp. 95-108.. Psychoanal Q., 29:589-590.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association. VII, 1959: The Self-Representation, Anality, and the Fear of Dying. Bernard Brodsky. Pp. 95-108.

(1960). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 29:589-590

Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association. VII, 1959: The Self-Representation, Anality, and the Fear of Dying. Bernard Brodsky. Pp. 95-108.

The author repudiates the concept of a death instinct as explaining the fear of death, and supplements Freud's derivation of the fear of death from castration anxiety and object loss. This common fear is related to memory traces of earlier states in which the self-image is extinguished. Data from three analytic patients emphasize the anally fixating influences common to the mothers of the three, and their prolonged interference with the autonomy of the patients in childhood. The

- 589 -

patients had in common a rather tenuous sense of identity, marked fear of the loss of feeling of self, extreme dependence upon the continued existence of the love object, and intense anal-sadistic impulses toward the destruction of the object. For all three, to be dead was to become feces. The author compares these data with the tendency of children to equate loss of thought and mobility with being dead. He theorizes that these various phenomena are linked by the common experience of an immature ego being drained of its limited quantity of neutralized energy cathecting the self-image by excessive instinctual and affective tensions. When this occurs the self-image is temporarily extinguished and ego boundaries blurred. Anal rage is particularly linked with ideas of death in so far as the stool epitomizes that which is lifeless, useless, and worthless. In all three patients separation and castration anxiety complemented and intensified the anal contributions to extinction anxiety.

- 590 -

Article Citation

(1960). Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association. VII, 1959. Psychoanal. Q., 29:589-590

Copyright © 2021, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.