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(1967). Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association. XII, 1964: Psychoanalytic Studies on Joseph Conrad. III. Aspects of Orality. Bernard C. Meyer. Pp. 562-586.. Psychoanal Q., 36:133-134.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association. XII, 1964: Psychoanalytic Studies on Joseph Conrad. III. Aspects of Orality. Bernard C. Meyer. Pp. 562-586.

(1967). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 36:133-134

Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association. XII, 1964: Psychoanalytic Studies on Joseph Conrad. III. Aspects of Orality. Bernard C. Meyer. Pp. 562-586.

The author presents material from various novels of Conrad, such as Amy Foster, The Secret Agent, and An Outcast of the Islands, to demonstrate Conrad's unresolved oral fixations and how the vicissitudes of his own life are depicted in his novels. For example, Amy Foster is a narrative depicting Conrad's own expatriation, his marriage to an English girl, and his subsequent fear of dethronement by his son, Bornys. The depiction of a symbolic reunion of mother and child is a frequent theme of Conrad. His writings not only provided an outlet for his active oral cravings but expressed the more subtle aspects of orality as conceptualized in Lewin's oral triad.

In Conrad's personal life, as well as in his fictional world, orality played a

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striking role. Likewise, the death of Conrad's mother when he was very young left a profound melancholic imprint on his character and a constant yearning to retrieve the lost mother. It is suggested that Conrad avoided his mother tongues—Polish and French—in his literary creations in order to maintain a screen between his fictional world and his own unhappy childhood. Yet, his narratives did not suffice to conceal his melancholy, and in the last phase of his life 'his thoughts turned to going home to Poland, there to live out what remained of his life and, no doubt, to die too …'.

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Article Citation

(1967). Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association. XII, 1964. Psychoanal. Q., 36:133-134

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