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(1967). Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease. CXXXIX, 1964: Individual Differences in the Recall of a Drug Experience. I. H. Paul; Robert J. Langs; and Harriet Linton Barr. Pp. 132-145.. Psychoanal Q., 36:142-142.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease. CXXXIX, 1964: Individual Differences in the Recall of a Drug Experience. I. H. Paul; Robert J. Langs; and Harriet Linton Barr. Pp. 132-145.

(1967). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 36:142-142

Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease. CXXXIX, 1964: Individual Differences in the Recall of a Drug Experience. I. H. Paul; Robert J. Langs; and Harriet Linton Barr. Pp. 132-145.

The present study focuses on significant individual differences which effect the recall of experience under LSD-25. Subjects were tested while they were under the influence of the drug and then subsequently. Some accurately recalled the drug experience (recallers). Others tended to drop or forget aspects of the experience (subtracters); and others embellished and enlarged the experience in retrospect (adders). The subtracter was found to be an obsessive-compulsive character with hysterical features. He is well integrated, effectively defends, uses intellectual defenses, and shows strong striving for independence. His defenses are likely to be adaptive in the face of the threatening nature of the drug experience. The adder is narcissistic and schizoid and may show a thought disturbance. In contrast to the subtracter he is poorly integrated, uses a wide variety of defenses, but does not seem to be able to use them effectively. He is dependent, naïve, trusting, and passive-receptive. The recaller is an inhibited obsessive-compulsive character who generally experiences little manifest anxiety and has a narrow range of rigid yet quite effective defenses. The authors conclude that the modes of recalling the drug experience seem to be a function of the individual's cognitive style and personality structure.

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Article Citation

(1967). Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease. CXXXIX, 1964. Psychoanal. Q., 36:142-142

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