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Waldhorn, H.F. (1967). Drives, Affects, Behavior. Vol. II. Essays in Memory of Marie Bonaparte: Edited by Max Schur, M.D. New York: International Universities Press, Inc., 1965. 502 pp.. Psychoanal Q., 36:279-281.

(1967). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 36:279-281

Drives, Affects, Behavior. Vol. II. Essays in Memory of Marie Bonaparte: Edited by Max Schur, M.D. New York: International Universities Press, Inc., 1965. 502 pp.

Review by:
Herbert F. Waldhorn

This second volume of papers entitled Drives, Affects, Behavior, dedicated to Marie Bonaparte, contains in its Introduction a small selection of letters written by her to Freud in the thirties, chiefly concerning the acquisition of the Fliess correspondence. These letters, and Freud's replies, offer an additional demonstration of the special philosophical insights and steadfast devotion to psychoanalysis that pervaded Marie Bonaparte's diverse interests as well as her contributions to psychoanalysis itself. Much of the same sort of insight and dedication is evident in the seventeen memorial essays, written by some of our most outstanding clinicians, teachers, researchers, and theoreticians.

The book is divided into five sections: Contributions to Psychoanalytic Theory, Aspects of Normal and Pathological Development, Clinical Contributions, Technique, and Applied Psychoanalysis. No single thread runs through the collection which rigidly orders the ideas presented or prescribes a set sequence for reading the papers. However, David Beres' study of Psychoanalysis, Science, and Romanticism can serve as a valuable starting point for it helps to generate an intellectual alertness and perspective with which to approach the remainder of the volume. Beres' discussion of the development of Freud's ideas out of the philosophical and scientific matrix of his time points to the place of psychoanalysis in the community of sciences. Moreover, the paper illuminates in a richly documented, scholarly fashion many questions related to theory, methodology, clinical technique, and research.

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