Login
(1969). Archives of General Psychiatry. XV, 1966: Early Socialization Experiences and Intra-Familial Environment. Martha S. Oleinick; Anita K. Bahn; Leon Eisenberg; Abraham M. Lilienfeld. Pp. 344-353.. Psychoanal Q., 38:513.
    

Welcome to PEP Web!

Viewing the full text of this document requires a subscription to PEP Web.

If you are coming in from a university from a registered IP address or secure referral page you should not need to log in. Contact your university librarian in the event of problems.

If you have a personal subscription on your own account or through a Society or Institute please put your username and password in the box below. Any difficulties should be reported to your group administrator.

Username:
Password:

Can't remember your username and/or password? If you have forgotten your username and/or password please click here and log in to the PaDS database. Once there you need to fill in your email address (this must be the email address that PEP has on record for you) and click "Send." Your username and password will be sent to this email address within a few minutes. If this does not work for you please contact your group organizer.

Athens or federation user? Login here.

Not already a subscriber? Order a subscription today.

Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Archives of General Psychiatry. XV, 1966: Early Socialization Experiences and Intra-Familial Environment. Martha S. Oleinick; Anita K. Bahn; Leon Eisenberg; Abraham M. Lilienfeld. Pp. 344-353.

(1969). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 38:513

Archives of General Psychiatry. XV, 1966: Early Socialization Experiences and Intra-Familial Environment. Martha S. Oleinick; Anita K. Bahn; Leon Eisenberg; Abraham M. Lilienfeld. Pp. 344-353.

This is a summary presentation of a study, its methods and findings. Major areas studied are parental behavior and attitudes toward early childhood socialization practices, separation of child from parent, and familial interaction patterns. Three groups were used and matched for race, age, and sex: 1, children from a psychiatric outpatient clinic; 2, children from a pediatric clinic, ophthalmology clinic, and some who had had a tonsillectomy or appendectomy; and 3, children in the local public school. Socio-economic matching was only roughly achieved. Differences in early socialization practices did not correlate significantly with any group but rather related more reliably with social class. However, the psychiatric group clearly differed with a significantly higher level of nuclear family disruption and a greater frequency of child-parent separation.

Unfortunately, this study, with due deference to the significance of negative findings, is thought to lend further weight to the lack of significance of early socialization experiences in the development of psychopathology. Further critical discussion is not possible here, but it is interesting to note that this study shows that children do react to significant separation with behavioral symptomatology. However, adult retrospective studies show poor correlation between childhood separation and adult mental illness. Could we also be looking for significant relationships in the wrong time and place? Do mothers turn to sociocultural child-rearing standards when they are unable to recall their own specific practices?


WARNING! This text is printed for the personal use of the PEPWeb subscriber and is copyright to the Journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to copy, distribute or circulate it in any form.
- 513 -

Article Citation

(1969). Archives of General Psychiatry. XV, 1966. Psychoanal. Q., 38:513

Copyright © 2014, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing. Help | About | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Problem

WARNING! This text is printed for the personal use of the subscriber to PEP Web and is copyright to the Journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to copy, distribute or circulate it in any form whatsoever.