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(1973). International Journal of Group Psychotherapy. XXI, 1971: Laughter in Group Psychotherapy. Martin Grotjahn. Pp. 234-238.. Psychoanal Q., 42:161.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: International Journal of Group Psychotherapy. XXI, 1971: Laughter in Group Psychotherapy. Martin Grotjahn. Pp. 234-238.

(1973). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 42:161

International Journal of Group Psychotherapy. XXI, 1971: Laughter in Group Psychotherapy. Martin Grotjahn. Pp. 234-238.

The group therapist should feel free to laugh with his patients, since laughter indicates freedom from fear of losing control, while his sense of humor prevents infantilization of the group. Interpretations in the form of jokes bypass resistances and can be accepted. Exaggerated amusement, though, often indicates something the patient dare not say directly. Telling jokes, especially anecdotal jokes, can be a form of resistance, particularly in the individual who feels he must entertain instead of reveal himself. Laughter indicates the release of repressed hostility, especially the laughter of superiority when the unconscious is inadvertently revealed.

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Article Citation

(1973). International Journal of Group Psychotherapy. XXI, 1971. Psychoanal. Q., 42:161

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