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Blank, H.R. (1973). Psychoanalytic Studies of the Sighted and the Blind: By Dorothy Burlingham. New York: International Universities Press, Inc., 1972. 396 pp.. Psychoanal Q., 42:457-458.

(1973). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 42:457-458

Psychoanalytic Studies of the Sighted and the Blind: By Dorothy Burlingham. New York: International Universities Press, Inc., 1972. 396 pp.

Review by:
H. Robert Blank

Dorothy Burlingham needs no introduction as a pioneer and outstanding contributor to child analysis and psychoanalytic work with blind children. The quality of her work is constantly reflected in her lucid, concise and stimulating writing. This collection of major papers includes several that have been published previously only in German. They deal with many subjects, interlinked by a strong leitmotiv—Burlingham's pervasive interest in the child-mother relationship.

Part I, Child Analysis and the Sighted, contains eleven papers. Probably best known of these are Simultaneous Analysis of Mother and Child (written with Alice Goldberger and André Lussier), and A Study of Identical Twins (with Arthur T. Barron).

Part II, Development of the Blind, contains six papers beginning with Psychoanalytic Observations of Blind Children, originally published in German in 1940, and first published in English as Psychic Problems of the Blind, in American Imago in 1941. The present version is a new translation of the original. The last five papers emerged from the sustained creative work of Burlingham and her co-workers at the Nursery School for Blind Children of the Hampstead Child Therapy Clinic.

The general excellence of these contributions, most of which I have read with profit two or three times, makes it impossible for me to rank them as to quality for neophyte, experienced analyst, or other professional worker.

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