Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To see statistics of the Most Popular Journal Articles on PEP-Web…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

Statistics of the Most Popular Journal Articles on PEP-Web can be reviewed at any time. Just click the “See full statistics” link located at the end of the Most Popular Journal Articles list in the PEP Section.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Wolpert, E.A. (1973). The Effect of Stress on Dreams. Psychological Issues, Vol. VII, No. 3, Monograph 27: By Louis Breger, Ian Hunter, and Ron W. Lane. New York: International Universities Press, Inc., 1972. 213 pp.. Psychoanal Q., 42:626-627.

(1973). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 42:626-627

The Effect of Stress on Dreams. Psychological Issues, Vol. VII, No. 3, Monograph 27: By Louis Breger, Ian Hunter, and Ron W. Lane. New York: International Universities Press, Inc., 1972. 213 pp.

Review by:
Edward A. Wolpert

The present study was conceived to demonstrate 'that dreams may serve a unique function in the integration or assimilation of affectively aroused information into the "solutions" embodied in existing memory systems'. A standard presleep stimulus, such as being a 'focus' for a sensitivity group meeting, or being prepared for surgery, was presented to the subject and his dreams obtained by EEG-REM monitoring.

Two types of analyses were done on the collected dreams. First, case studies of each subject were made and the obtained dreams 'analyzed' from an external point of view, without benefit of experimenter-subject interaction. Second, content ratings were made along three parameters to serve as a check on the case study-dream analysis method. Generally speaking the content ratings support the dream interpretation-reconstructions.

The results of the study indicate that the sensitivity group did produce a stress on each subject when he or she was the focus of the group, and that surgery, as could be expected, was also a stress. In all cases the subjects handled the stress in a way congruent to what was known of their personalities beforehand. The only unexpected finding was that several patients could recall few or no dreams upon REM awakening prior to surgery, while postsurgery recall was more normal.

The study is of interest because it reports an extensive series of sequential nocturnal dreams in patients undergoing stated stress. However, the dream analyses show no advance in technique over analyses of sequential nocturnal dreams made in more routine experimental subjects over fifteen years ago.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2021, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.