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(1974). American Imago. XXX, 1973: The Iliad: Agamemnon's Dream. Stephen Reid. Pp. 33-56.. Psychoanal Q., 43:695.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: American Imago. XXX, 1973: The Iliad: Agamemnon's Dream. Stephen Reid. Pp. 33-56.

(1974). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 43:695

American Imago. XXX, 1973: The Iliad: Agamemnon's Dream. Stephen Reid. Pp. 33-56.

In Book II of The Iliad, Zeus sends an evil dream to Agamemnon in the person of Nestor. The dream advises Agamemnon to urge the Greek army to attack the Trojans and is evil in the sense that the Greeks, depleted by the withdrawal of Achilles and his troops, would surely lose. Reid disregards Zeus as the source of the dream and treats it as Agamemnon's dream. Achilles has withdrawn in response to an insult delivered by Agamemnon. It is Reid's thesis that the latent wish of the dream was to cause a panic in the Greek army, have the troops run to the ships, and create the fear in Achilles that he would be left alone to face the Trojans. Such an outcome would serve both to retaliate by putting Achilles in the same situation that Agamemnon was in and to force Achilles to rally to the fight, thus giving the combined Greek forces an excellent chance of defeating the Trojans. Reid's argument finds some support in a line of Agamemnon's address to the Greek army, which has been variously translated by scholars. A literal interpretation could be understood as a slip of the tongue, revealing his design to the soldiers he is trying to frighten while urging them to fight.

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Article Citation

(1974). American Imago. XXX, 1973. Psychoanal. Q., 43:695

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